Monthly Archives: April 2016

André Suares : navigation

Henosophia TOPOSOPHIA μαθεσις uni√ersalis τοποσοφια MATHESIS οντοποσοφια ενοσοφια

Seul absolument seul. Tous, ils dorment. Je veille. Je suis responsable du navire et de la marche. Je sors de la bourrasque ; j’échappe à la gueule du cataclysme : derrière moi encore, le ciel et l…

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Pique-nique à Hanging rock (Peter Weir, 1975)

Henosophia TOPOSOPHIA μαθεσις uni√ersalis τοποσοφια MATHESIS οντοποσοφια ενοσοφια

Ce très beau film , réalisé par Peter Weir (l’auteur du “Cercle des poètes disparus) peut être vu ici sur YouTube, mais en anglais non sous titré: Si jamais ce lien est supprimé par You…

Source : Pique-nique à Hanging rock (Peter Weir, 1975)

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Ce qui cloche chez Mehdi Belhaj Kacem ( la transgression et l’inexistant)

Henosophia TOPOSOPHIA μαθεσις uni√ersalis τοποσοφια MATHESIS οντοποσοφια ενοσοφια

Cet ebook “La transgression et l’inexistant” peut être acheté ici : Voici ce qu’on peut lire dans le “résumé” du livre : “L’indice qui marque décisivement …

Source : Ce qui cloche chez Mehdi Belhaj Kacem ( la transgression et l’inexistant)

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Letter to a Woman with a Child Never Born

To Kill A Mocking Girl

Today, splendid Child, as I was frolicking in the delicate April breeze, I have plucked you from the meadow, your honeyed odours falling in drops on the musings of my heart, apple of my eye. You lay sleeping, slumbering, rolling in the soft dust your dreams are made of, curled up between the early tulips in tones of orange and coral and cherry-red, but I only had eyes for you, stroking your petals painted blackest of night, beautiful one. Yesterday, heavenly Child, the pear-shaped tears of March’s downpours mollifying my skin, I have taken you from your bed of flowers, without permission, you were breathing my name, chiming like a cascade of water falling to splinters on the creamy lake of my eardrums, my beloved. You mirrored me, the one who gifted you with life, save my fair locks of hair, since I crowned your blossoms, those divine little ringlets…

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Ralph Waldo Emerson | The Book of Life

Ars, Arte et Labore

“This leaves open a vital question: what is your nature once you have rid yourself of history, tradition and religion? What can be said is that it is not self-indulgence, it is not hedonism, it is not narcissism – rather it is the surrender to that force which Emerson recognised back in the Jardin des Plantes: it is obedience to nature itself.

By nature Emerson seemed to mean the natural world – plants, animals, rocks and sky – but what he really meant was God. For Emerson was a Pantheist, someone who believed that God exists in every part of creation, from the smallest grain of sand to a star – but also, crucially, that the divine spark is in each of us. In following ourselves we are not being merely fickle and selfish, but rather releasing a Divine Will that history, society and organised religion have hidden from us.

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